How To Get Rid Of Racoons In Attic

Get Rid Of Racoons In Attic
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The raccoon population is growing at an alarming rate. These creatures are not only a nuisance but can also be dangerous to your home and family if they decide to enter your attic or crawl space. They will destroy anything that they encounter, leaving you with costly repairs, messes, and pest problems that are hard to get rid of. How do I get rid of raccoons in my attic? Read on for helpful tips!

1. Identifying Whether You Have Raccoons In Your Attic

Raccoons will visit a good neighborhood that has a water source nearby. If you have a pool, or other similar body of water nearby, then it is highly likely that raccoons are living in your attic at night.

Racoons will make an enormous mess and damage to your home if they live there. They also carry parasites and diseases that can be detrimental to the health of your family. You should hire professionals to get rid of raccoons as soon as possible before the problem gets worse.

If you don’t have a water source nearby, but you do have trees nearby, this could be indicative of their presence too because raccoons love to climb trees. If you suspect that they are around, check your home for their droppings. Raccoon droppings look similar to cat or dog droppings, but will be larger in size.

2. Do It Right The First Time!

Examining your attic for potential entrances is the first step in getting rid of raccoons using DIY methods. Racoons typically get into attics through an opening about the size of a fist, so you’ll need to locate all of these areas before trying any DIY methods.

Using your flashlight, look for any holes that are large enough for the animal to get through. If there are no visible holes, go outside and find an area where you could see raccoon tracks on the ground. Raccoons usually travel around at night, so they may leave paw prints near each entrance point. Once you’ve found them all; seal up all but one or two with steel wool if necessary (this will prevent them from getting in again while still allowing bats access). The remaining entrances should be closed off using heavy-duty netting secured by staples (£10) . Holes should not be larger than 1.5 inches and should be covered with mesh wire to prevent young raccoons from entering the attic.

However, if the entries points are too small for a net or you do not know where they are; hire a wildlife removal expert so that your home is sealed up 100%. This way there is no chance of little ones getting through and getting stuck.

3. Poisoning them!

Poisoning raccoons in your attic using poisonous food baits is another effective method that does not require their eviction or harming them. The best place for baiting poisonous food, such as pet food and meat scraps (kosher meats work well), is below one of the raccoon’s entry points.

Raccoons are scavengers by nature and will naturally gravitate to a good food source. They should not detect any poison in their foods because it is encapsulated in a pellet form, which means that they will be left unharmed after ingesting it. The bait should only be used if you have one entry point open so that there is no chance of spreading the poison around your home or into areas where pets or humans could get hold of it.

An alternative method for poisoned baits is to scatter them across your roof. The idea behind this method is that raccoons will eat them while descending from the roof to their den, thus exposing them lethal doses of toxins. Once again, the baits should be used if you have one or two entrance points left open.

4. Removing them using eviction fluid!

Raccoon eviction fluid can be used to remove raccoons from your attic once they are confirmed to be living there. Mixing up a batch of homemade raccoon eviction fluid is an effective way of driving the animals out at night while not harming them in any way. Other methods may resort to killing, but this method does not require their harm and ensures that other creatures are also protected thanks to being non-lethal. You’ll need 2 gallons of hot water, 1 cup laundry detergent, 1 quart vegetable oil, and 2 cups of molasses.

Once you have these ingredients, mix them all together in a large bucket and place the filled bucket under the raccoon’s entry point. The smell will be very overwhelming to them and they’ll need to leave immediately or risk being attacked by other raccoons who are already living in your attic. Once one has left, plug up their entrance points with steel wool so that they cannot get back in again.

This eviction fluid recipe is only effective if you have one or two animals living in your home; it is not strong enough for multiple creatures occupying the same space. If you’ve used this method successfully but are still seeing signs of their presence (droppings/tracks); then there may be another way into your home and the process of eviction will need to be repeated.

5. Exclusion!

Raccoon exclusion is another effective method for removing them from your attic, but it doesn’t come cheap! Due to being nocturnal animals, exclusion works well because they are less active at night so you won’t have to worry about trapping or harming them in any way. What’s involved here is hiring a professional wildlife control company who specialise in raccoon removal, which can cost anywhere between £200-£400 depending on where you live (£250 average).

Professional exclusions involve the use of one-way doors that allow them leave but not return into their den. Once the raccoons have been evicted from their den, they must either find a new one or face dying from starvation. Alternatively, you can purchase a one-way door yourself and carry out the exclusion yourself to save money.

This is a very effective way of evicting them from your home as long as you can afford it! Raccoons are known for being crafty animals who learn how to open doors if they’re not shut properly after entering, so make sure that all entry points are sealed off securely as soon as the exclusion process has been completed.

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